Fitness has become a precise science. Whether you’re a weightlifter, play a team sport or are CrossFit mad, there’s a science to achieving your fitness goals that includes a number of factors from your diet to your workout schedule and even individual exercises you incorporate into your workout.

After the major learning curve of starting to get in shape that everyone experiences we realise that there’s no use in just doing things and hoping for the best. There’s a reason we eat certain things and perform certain moves and, depending on how interested we are, we can quite easily research the science behind it.

boost your mood

So, if we’re counting our macros for bodybuilding or following a paleo diet for CrossFit and we’re studying WODs or following a pyramid style weight lifting program to give our bodies the fuel and training they need to achieve our goals, why not go one step further?

Scientific analysis has long been seen purely as an aspect of fitness only attainable by pro-athletes. Sure, football players may get a full-body check-up but little old me? Trips to the doctor are for a problem that has already arisen, not to look for a problem that we don’t know is there yet. However, studying your body on a more biological level may be what you need to take your fitness to the next level.

Nowadays, it’s never been so easy to take the state of your health into your own hands and there are even online packages available that you can subscribe to which provide you with blood tests and allow you to keep track of your biological data on a monthly basis.

Diet plan

So what can personal lab findings tell you, and how can this benefit your fitness journey? Biomarkers, which are factors considered when studying a blood sample, can include nutrition, hormones and inflammation as well as many other such as disease. These biomarkers can tell us a lot about our personal biology and can help us to construct a strategy to correct a problem or predict a future problem. So how can making adjustments based on our results have notable benefits? Read on to find out five ways your fitness can benefit from personal lab findings.

5 Ways Lab Findings Will Take Your Workout to the Next Level

  1. Improve Your Mood

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Nutritional analysis performed in a blood test can quickly and easily show you what you’ve got and what you’re missing when it comes to vitamins and minerals. If you’re big on supplements, chances are you may be overtaking a particular micronutrient. However, the more likely scenario is that you’re deficient in something. Vitamin deficiency can play a major part in stabilising your mood. Vitamin D deficiency is fairly common, especially in the winter months, and this may have an unwanted effect on your mood. Magnesium is also a game-changer when it comes to mood and up to 55% of Americans aren’t getting enough. Giving yourself the best chance of sustaining a good mood will go a long way in getting you ready to face the day and keeping you motivated in the gym.

 

  1. Improve Energy Levels

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In a similar vein to improving your mood, if you’ve been feeling fine but you’re energy levels just aren’t where they need to be, blood tests highlighting deficiencies can also correct this. Making sure you’re getting the correct amount of vitamin B6 is the first step to correcting any problems you’re having with lethargy. Vitamin B6 is used to turn food into energy and if blood tests find that we’re lacking, we’re probably not feeling as sprightly as usual. Correcting your nutrition is the best way to get the spring back in your step.

  1. Boost Your Metabolism

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Other hormones imbalances that can play a major apart in how your body reacts to your fitness regime include testosterone and estrogen. Testosterone is present in both men and women (though to a much lesser degree) and affects how our bodies build muscle and strength. An unfavourable level of testosterone can influence how effectively you build muscle and store fat. Estrogen also has a similar impact on our body. Again, both men and women have estrogen but this time it’s women who hold a higher amount. Estrogen can have an effect on both muscle recovery and fat storage – again having a potentially major effect on the success of your fitness regime.

4. Muscle vs Fat

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Other hormones imbalances that can play a major apart in how your body reacts to your fitness regime include testosterone and estrogen. Testosterone is present in both men and women (though to a much lesser degree) and affects how our bodies build muscle and strength. An unfavourable level of testosterone can influence how effectively you build muscle and store fat. Estrogen also has a similar impact on our body. Again, both men and women have estrogen but this time it’s women who hold a higher amount. Estrogen can have an effect on both muscle recovery and fat storage – again having a potentially major effect on the success of your fitness regime.

5. Predict & Avoid Injury

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One of the most interesting uses of personal biodata is to predict and avoid injury. This is becoming increasingly popular in pro-sports, as the industry can spend an unimaginable amount on injured athletes every season. Nifty gadgets can now track how the bodies of athletes are working and at what efficiency. From simple data like heart rate to minute imbalances in muscle usage or pressure placement, these findings can reveal if they have any weaknesses from previous injuries that are not being taken into consideration or if they are using their bodies in an imbalanced way that could potentially lead to an injury. This allows coaches and athletes to make adjustments in both training methods and performance that can save everyone time and money that is often spent on recovery.

Health care professionals working in laboratory.

It’s true that no matter how dedicated to fitness we are, we don’t all have access to the same resources as pro-athletes. However it’s getting easier and easier to track your body’s progress on a micro level.

This is republished article. Originally this article was published by http://healthyhampster.com

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